Walking with my head in the clouds

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Does anyone actually remember that? I don’t know if it is a thing people say anymore but when I was growing up I would always drift away while walking. Kind of like how my mind casually moves from one topic to another while running, I would do the same thing while walking when I was younger. My head was always in the clouds. Always. And until I actually took the time to pay attention to my surroundings today, I thought it would be the same for other people.

Today I had to go to various meetings in London and since there was enough time between them and the weather was decent I decided to walk. I covered a lot of London Town today and it was lovely. But what I noticed was that almost everyone seemed to be in their phone doing whatever it is they do with their phone. No one was looking up, no one was looking around, and too many of them weren’t looking where they were going.

This much be the new head in the clouds. This is what people do now while they walk – they tweet and text and stay connected with the world. I can definitely see the appeal of that – the world carries on moving and missing out can be pretty annoying. And this is the same with me in my own thoughts in my head – like people in their phones I am vaguely aware of what’s going on around me (enough to not get run over) but am concentrating on something else a lot more.

But, and this is a serious question, how do people in their phones not fall over? How do they not trip over that one random lose paving slab and land flat on their face? The moment I try to walk and tweet I know that will happen to me. I will be that heap on the floor crying pathetically. I think the answer to this is the same answer to how some women can put on makeup in the train without poking themselves in the eye: skill and talent and practice.

I don’t have the patience for any of that. Plus when you look around you see some very cool things. Like the sign on the photo above. That sign I saw in Kent and it made me laugh.

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