I am the child of immigrants. This shaped me and two things which my parents passed down – one unconsciously and one consciously – are:

  1. That the class system is for other people and literally means nothing.
  2. That education is your ticket to freedom.

Education was how I would make my life, gain my independence, and secure my future. It is what would expand my mind, introduce me to views which matched my own, introduce me to view which wouldn’t, and introduce me to views I hadn’t even thought of. However my life and upbringing never meant that I had to fight to get an education, like Tara Westover. She fought tooth and nail to expand her mind and Educated is the story of how she achieved that.

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Everything I Know About Love by Dolly Alderton

Everything I Know About Love by Dolly Alderton

This is one of the books I was so excited about reading in 2018. To be honest, I don’t know why – until I heard about it, I didn’t know who Dolly Alderton was; I didn’t know she was a journalist, I didn’t listen to her podcast, and I didn’t follow her on social media. But there was something about the subject matter and definitely something about the cover which made me want to get it as soon as possible.  (And it is such a beautiful cover isn’t it?)

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Still Me by Jojo Moyes

Still Me by Jojo Moyes

I read Me Before You much, much later than everyone else did. I am not one of those people who eschew from things because they are everywhere in popular culture; quite the opposite actually. With the first in Lou’s story I just missed everything. It was very different with After You which I have reviewed here. I read that in 2015 and re-reading my review I think I was very kind. Frankly I didn’t enjoy it. So when I managed to grab an advance copy of Still Me at the end of last year, I was very reticent about actually reading it. But read it I did.

WARNING: there are spoilers for both Me Before You and After You in this review.

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Force of Nature by Jane Harper

Force of Nature by Jane Harper

I am one of those very, very luck people who sometimes get books for free for review purposes. When I come home from work and see a parcel waiting for me I rip into it as if there is a time limit on its survivability. Any delay and the parcel will implode and be rendered useless. This particular parcel was non-descript (like they all are) but contained a book I was so excited about reading, that I did a little jig of happiness. Not only that, but it was signed. I might have died a little with joy.

A little over a year ago I reviewed Jane Harper’s The Dry and today I bring you a review of the sequel, Force of Nature.

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Blog tour alert! To celebrate the release of Celeste Ng’s new book Little Fires Everywhere I am part of the blog tour arranged by the publishers, Little Brown. I have read the book, loved the book and reviewed it below.

In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is planned — from the layout of the winding roads, to the colors of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules…

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