Force of Nature by Jane Harper

Force of Nature by Jane Harper

I am one of those very, very luck people who sometimes get books for free for review purposes. When I come home from work and see a parcel waiting for me I rip into it as if there is a time limit on its survivability. Any delay and the parcel will implode and be rendered useless. This particular parcel was non-descript (like they all are) but contained a book I was so excited about reading, that I did a little jig of happiness. Not only that, but it was signed. I might have died a little with joy.

A little over a year ago I reviewed Jane Harper’s The Dry and today I bring you a review of the sequel, Force of Nature.

View Full Post

I am part of a book blog tour! I love these because a) I get to read a book well before publication, and b) well, I get to read a book well before publication.  Initially I wasn’t sent an actual copy of a The House. I was sent an envelope with a set of keys and a clue to unlocking a website….

Once I managed to solve that clue I was sent a copy of this book. It arrived almost perfectly as my holiday to Canada began so into my hand luggage it went. Enter stage left my mum who decided that she wanted to travel to Canada without hand luggage. I don’t know what her plan was – to survive a ten hour flight on wishful thinking and glitter? – but she lasted about three minutes after take-off before asking me if she could read The House. Since I am The Best Daughter In The World, I gave her the book and then spent a sizeable amount of time watching her plough through it, trying not to scream at one more exclamation of shock.

View Full Post

Blog tour alert! To celebrate the release of Leopard at the Door, the author Jennifer McVeight has written a piece for me all about the grammar of the book. That’s all below the cut but before you all get to read what she’s written, let me tell you a little more about Leopard at the Door

Stepping off the boat in Mombasa, eighteen-year-old Rachel Fullsmith stands on Kenyan soil for the first time in six years. She has come home.

But when Rachel reaches the family farm at the end of the dusty Rift Valley Road, she finds so much has changed. Her beloved father has moved his new partner and her son into the family home. She hears menacing rumours of Mau Mau violence, and witnesses cruel reprisals by British soldiers. Even Michael, the handsome Kikuyu boy from her childhood, has started to look at her differently.

Isolated and conflicted, Rachel fears for her future. But when home is no longer a place of safety and belonging, where do you go, and who do you turn to?

View Full Post

When Imogen Dacres’ brother, Robbie, dies in mysterious circumstances, she travels to Bermuda in search of the truth. From the minute she sets out on her journey, Imogen is plunged into a web of secrets, lies and mistaken identity. She soon realises that beneath the glamour of Bermuda, there are dangerous forces intent on doing her harm…

View Full Post

William Benson is a barrister with a difference: he has a murder conviction to his name.

When I was given the chance to be part of this blog tour I jumped at the chance. Well written legal thrillers are brilliant and this one sounded as if it would fit perfectly into that category. As a barrister Will Benson is the underdog and not many people in his profession want him to succeed. But a few key people have always been in his corner and thanks to them and his determination Summary Justice starts with Will being asked to defend a woman accused of murder.

View Full Post